Bitcoin gets into schools in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Key facts:

  • Bitcoin, stablecoins, budgets, and credit products are some of the topics addressed.
  • The bitcoin exchange, Ripio, participated in the development of the content.

As of the 2022 school year, students who are in the last year of secondary school in public and private schools in the City of Buenos Aires, Argentina, will participate in a cycle of financial education. Bitcoin (BTC) and cryptocurrencies are among the topics to be addressed.

The compulsory cycle will have 18 lecture hours. Its course will be before the work practices that students will develop in companies and organizations. There will be no evaluations, but the mere presence and fulfillment of the hourly load are sufficient for approval.

The classes of financial education will not be dictated by teachers in schools, but by a team assigned by the Ministry of Education. They will be held at the Development Training Center, a building located in the Barracas neighborhood.

Among the instructors will be members of companies and foundations with which the Government of the City of Buenos Aires (GCBA) has established communication for the development of this cycle. Among these companies is the bitcoin exchange, Ripio, which is led by its CEO and founder, Sebastián Serrano.

Other fintech companies that accompany the initiative and contribute their experience to the development of the content are Ualá, Mercado Libre, Mujer Financiera, Balanz, Afluenta, Poincenot, and the Argentine Fintech Chamber.

The latter entity recently caused some unpleasantness among bitcoiners in the South American nation. As reported by CriptoNoticias, the malaise occurred due to its proposed guidelines to regulate cryptocurrencies in the country, by the guidelines of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF).

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Eugenia Cortana, undersecretary of the Agency for Lifelong Learning, dependent on the GCBA, told the local newspaper Infobae:

“We wanted the students to have as a complement an initial cycle within the framework of their work placements, which included transversal skills for employability and finance, such as learning to manage their income, to save, to investigate what to invest in, how to undertake, among other The same companies in the sector told us that boys do not handle certain basic concepts for adult life.

Eugenia Cortana, Undersecretary of the Lifelong Learning Agency.

For her part, the Minister of Education of the City of Buenos Aires, Soledad Acuña, indicated that This initiative will serve “to equalize opportunities and prepare young people for their future as adults.” “We want to give students the experiences and knowledge necessary so that they can adapt quickly and efficiently to the work scheme,” he added.

CriptoNoticias contacted the Buenos Aires government to request details about the program, particularly about bitcoin and crypto-assets. As of this writing, no official response has been received.

AdvertisingPossible Internet Curriculum Leaks

Unofficially, what would be the agenda of the Financial Education cycle has circulated on social networks. Module 6 is the one that specifically deals with “electronic wallets and cryptocurrencies (sic)”.

A Financial Education assignment syllabus circulates unofficially on the Internet; there you can see content related to bitcoin and cryptocurrencies. Fountain: Ignacio Carballo / Twitter.

As indicated in the aforementioned agenda that circulates unofficially, It will be studied on “bitcoin – volatility” and on stable coins. In addition, you will see how to make transfers and how the wallets are used.

Other topics indicated in the program are family and personal budget; responsible consumption; good financial habits; savings plan and credit products.

Ignacio Carballo, magister in economics and professor at the University of Buenos Aires, assumes the veracity of this program. In your account Twitter, He expressed his surprise at the lack of evaluation of the students and the error in writing “cryptocurrencies” and “crypto assets” in Spanish.

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